Zookeeper Report

Watusi

Happy Valentine’s Day!  When working with animals, there are definitely times when “Love is in the Air” around here!  We are proud of our successful breeding programs here at the zoo and for those who do not breed, successful companion relationships.  The picture above is of our Watusi (Ankole Cattle) native to Africa.  As you can see they handle the winter very well!  The male is larger in weight and stature, but the female has longer horns.  This pair had a very beautiful calf born last summer and many of our guests were able to witness the amazing birth.  As many of you know, we recently had a few babies born like Daisy the giraffe and a pair of African Crested Porcupines.  We’ve also had a llama born and a Debrazza guenon.  As zookeepers we are very lucky to be able to witness these exciting events and to care for these wonderful animals…and we are expecting a few more babies before we open!  Again, THANK YOU for sharing our love for animals on this cold, snowy Valentine’s Day!  We are looking for some towels, boomer balls and blankets as donations for the animals!

Zookeepers Report ` Oh Baby!

Baby Watusi under Mama's watchful eye!

This past summer we welcomed a baby Watusi to our family.  Watusi, also called Ankole Cattle, are native to Africa. Their horns can reach up to 8 feet and some males can weigh up to 1600 lbs!  This means that we have to be very careful when feeding and cleaning with these beautiful creatures. We especially have to be careful when momma Watusi has a new calf.  Watusi cattle are very protective of their young and in the wild you will find most calves in the middle of the herd.  Adults defend the herd by using their impressive horns and “stare” down tactics against intruders…and it can be very intimidating!  Momma Watusi right now is especially protective of her baby and will show signs of agitation if people get too close to her calf.  The calf is a little adventurous and momma is always right there for protection.  We ask that you  please stand back when the calf is close to the front of the exhibit, this is for your protection and momma’s peace of mind!